July 8, 2009

Aquasaurs Eggs!

As you may know DS (8) was given an Aquasaur kit for his birthday. We thought we had bad eggs, duds, until we were surprised to see one lone Aquasaur swimming around in the tank. We name that lone Aquasaur Spectacular.

Since we found him her we have been taking care of it like we are suppose too. Feeding it, changing the water regularly, etc. Well today when I went to change its water I noticed a few eggs. Perhaps, we will have new aquasaurs soon!

New Aquasaurs? Are you crazy? You just have one Aquasaur!! Well as I explain in the one post Aquasuars are really Triop Longicaudatus. Triop Longicaudatus can reproduce by parthenogenesis.

Parthenogenesis is an asexual form of reproduction found in females where growth and development of embryos occurs without fertilization by a male.

We have eggs so we will see what happens...

First shedding, Now the possibility of parthenogenesis.

EDIT ADD: I just realized that the eggs have to FULLY DRY OUT before they even have a chance to hatch! How do I collect the eggs? Where do I store them so they will dry out? Think, Think, Think....

6 comments:

  1. That is so cool. It sounds like the same thing as sea monkeys...we've not had much luck with them :(

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  2. I'm intrigued, my boys would love this!
    And it reminds me I have promised my scientist son to get sea monkeys. Are they the same thing?

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  3. No, they aren't quite the same thing. Sea Monkeys are really Brine Shrimp, where the Aquasaurs are Triops Longicaudatus.

    Similar animals but yet different.

    Brine Shrimp (Sea Monkeys)
    Scientific classification
    Kingdom: Animalia
    Phylum: Arthropoda
    Subphylum: Crustacea
    Class: Branchiopoda
    Order: Anostraca
    Family: Artemiidae
    Grochowski, 1895
    Genus: Artemia
    Leach, 1819

    Triops Longicaudatus (Aquasaurs)
    Kingdom: Animalia
    Phylum: Arthropoda
    Subphylum: Crustacea
    Class: Branchiopoda
    Infraclass: Calamanostraca
    Order: Notostraca
    Family: Triopsidae
    Genus: Triops
    Species: T. longicaudatus

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  4. My kids love any thing like that, they love the hands on stuff.
    As for those eggs...not sure, maybe you can get them out with an eyedroper?

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  5. Oh wow, that really sounds neat! I've never even heard of anything like it! :) What a great science project!

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